THE PHASE ONE FUNNEL

31 03 2010

It’s the end of the day, on the last day of the month. It’s late (about 10:30 p.m.) and I need to be up at 5:30 a.m. to take my daughter to swim practice, so this will be short.

Phase One is all about seeing the people, showing them the plan, getting them to training and enrolling them in the process.

A month ago I started tracking my daily and weekly numbers. I created a new list of people in the area.

  • I called 85 people
  • I actually spoke to 36 people
  • I piqued interest with 29 people
  • I invited 19 people to presentations
  • I presented to 10 people
  • I followed up with 6 of those I presented to
  • None of those have enrolled (yet).

This has been an interesting month for me to actually begin tracking my Phase One numbers.

I can look at the above numbers and see that I was only able to reach 42% of the people that I called. I left voice mails and emailed others, but it took 85 calls to reach 36 people. If I want to talk to 50 people, I need to make 118 calls. If I want to talk to 100 people, I need to make 236 calls. In reality? That’s 11-12 calls a day (factoring a five-day work week).

The other thing that stands out to me is that when I DO get in touch with people, it’s become relatively easy to pique interest with people. Two-thirds of the people are open to looking. Not surprisingly, only half of those actually show.

Any direct sales opportunity is just a numbers game. I need to increase my numbers, to increase my productivity. Right now? I need to put March (and myself) to bed.





GO FOR NO!

3 03 2010

I’m an avid reader. I tend to read at least one book a month. February’s title was “Go For No!” by Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz. While it’s a small volume (only about 70+ pages), it is packed with game-changing (and by extension LIFE-CHANGING) wisdom.

Written as prose, the book chronicles four days in the life of a struggling salesman and how he learns that getting “no’s” is a part of the sales process regardless of your product or profession. Once this is understood, then not only should we be “willing” to get no’s, we should WANT to get no’s. We should embrace and in fact, CELEBRATE the no’s.

For example, if you knew for a fact that to become an RVP, you have to get thru one hundred no’s personally first, why wouldn’t you just want to get them out of the way? If you know that three out of every ten people that you talk to about the business are going to “get in,” then you should be ecstatic when you come across the seven no’s.

On his classic recording, “Building Your Network Marketing Business” the late Jim Rohn says, “look I’ve got a new business, and I’m getting about three out of ten to join. And I don’t mind you just come to the meeting and be one of the seven.” Jim Rohn understood the lawa of averages and that “going for no” is just a part of the process.

While the premise of this book may seem like an absurdly simple process, there is genius in the paradigm shift that occurs while reading this book. One of the biggest challenges that most people face is not failing, but rather…having a little success. When we get one or two “yesses” most of us tend to take our foot off the gas. But by focusing on the need to get 100 no’s, a modicum of success will not allow us to take ourselves out of the game. This has been my biggest challenge.

I have always been “willing” to risk failure. I have never actively pursued it though.

All that changed after reading “Go For No!” In the last week, I increased the amount of phone calls I had been making by 400%. I’m on track this week to exceed that amount this week. I have presentations scheduled today, tomorrow and Friday. But even MORE significant? This is duplicating in my downline.

I’m not sure that I will ever meet Richard Fenton or Andrea Waltz, but they saved my life.

YES is the destination, but NO is how you get there.